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Astle One-Name Study
with Astles, Astell & Astill

Name


Date

Newspaper

Article

Ann

Astill

Monday 26/06/1865

Birmingham Daily Post

Birmingham Police Court:  - Threatening To Murder A Wife.

Annie

Astill

Saturday 15/10/1870

Leicester Chronicle & Leicester Mercury

Attempted Wife Murder in Nottingham.

Charles

Astill

Tuesday 03/04/1877

Birmingham Daily Post

Wolverhampton Orphan Asylum: - The Easter election to this charity came off yesterday, at the Institute, Goldthorn Hill, Wolverhampton. Thirteen boys and seven girls were to be admitted. For these vacancies there were eleven girl and twenty-eight boy candidates -in all, thirty-nine candidates for twenty vacancies. The candidates elected, with the votes which they received are as here: Boys - Charles Astill, Cossington, 1032;[highest].

Charles

Astill

Wednesday 13/07/1892

Derby Mercury

Derby County Police Court, Friday: - In Pursuit of Game: - Charles Astill and John Moore were summoned for trespassing in search of game on the land of Mr. Drury Lowe at Spondon on July 4. - James Clews, the son of a farmer deposed to seeing the men in the fields in search of game. - Mr. Stone, who defended, denied that the men were in search of game, urging that they were merely driving cows and the dog thay had with them was used for that purpose.  - The Bench decided to give the defendants the benefit of the doubt and dismissed the case.

Charlotte

Astill

Wednesday 18/06/1879

Derby Mercury

Castle Donington - Transfer of Public -House licenses. - At the Loughborough Petty Sessions, on Wednesday last, The Black Horse, Castle Hill, frrom Mrs. Charlotte Astill to Mr. Joseph Fowkes.

David

Astill

Wednesday 28/11/1860

Derby Mercury

Marriages: - At Emmanuel Church, Loughborough, on the 20th inst., by the Rev. R. J. Bunch, rector, Mr. David Astill to Miss Ann Hollier, postmistress both of that town

Edward

Astill

Tuesday 09/10/1866

Leeds Mercury

Serious Offence Against the Cattle Plague.

Edwin

Astill

Saturday 08/05/1869

Ipswich Journal

Marriages: - Astill - Flanders. - 28th ult., at Littleport, Cambs., E. Astill Esq., of Thurcaston, Leicestershire, to Emily, third daughter of S. Flanders, Esq., Littleport.

Ellen

Astill

Wednesday 23/12/1885

Birmingham Daily Post

London Gazette - from last night's gazette: - Adjudications: - John Astill, Blackstone street, Nottingham, Joiner and Ellen Astill, Blackstone Street, Nottingham, wife of John Astill, trading as dressmakers and fancy milliners.

George

Astill

Wednesday 11/06/1845

Derby Mercury

Committed to Derby County Gaol: - George Astill of Ticknall, committed to hard labour for one month, for want of sureties.

Henry

Astill

Wednesday 11/07/1855

Derby Mercury

Marriages: - On the 30th ult., at Mansfield by the Rev. Dr. Cursham, Mr. Henry Astill, of Loughborough, to Hannah, daughter of the late Mr. J. Wilson of Bagthorpe.

Henry

Astill

Saturday 03/08/1861

Bristol Mercury

From the London Gazettes: - Bankrupts. - Henry Astill, Loughborough, Leicestershire, ale and porter merchant, August 6, September 3, at the Birmingham District Court, Nottingham. Solicitor, Giles, Loughborough.

Henry

Astill

Monday 26/06/1865

Birmingham Daily Post

Birmingham Police Court:  - Threatening To Murder A Wife.

Henry

Astill

Saturday 19/10/1870

Leicester Chronicle & Leicester Mercury

Brutal Assault: - Thomas Timson was charged with assaulting Henry Astill. - Complainant whose face and head was one mass of bruises, said on the 15th inst., defendant came to his house, burst the door open, pulled him out of bed, and illtreated him in a most violent manner, inflicting on him the injuries he now presented. - Defendant admitted the assault, but said complainant was in the habit of abusing his father, who was blind. - The magistrates considered it a brutal affair, and ordered defendant to pay a fine of 42s. or a month.

James

Astill

Wednesday 25/11/1874

Derby Mercury

Alfreton Petty Sessions Friday, James Astill of Pinxton, was charged with assaulting Ann Barnes, a married woman, on the evening of the 19th November, near Pinxton Toll Bar. - Fined 2s. 6d. and 11s. 6d. Costs.

John

Astill

Wednesday 24/02/1864

Derby Mercury

Repton Petty Sessions, Feb 17. - Joseph Worrall and John Astill, of Melbourne, appeared to answer information laid by Mr. Lawson, charging them with having in their possession and in use scales that were unjust and against the customer. Mr. Lawson proved both cases, and said that he did not wish to press the case against the defendants, as he thought it likely the scales might have got out of order more through negligence than with intent to defraud. - The defendants were convicted and fined in the mitigated penalty of 1s.and 11s. 6d. costs each.

John

Astill

Wednesday 03/11/1875

Aberdeen Journal

Pickpockets at the Aulton Market

John

Astill

Tuesday 27/08/1878

Liverpool Mercury

Births: - Astill. - Aug. 25., at 22, Spring Street, the wife of John Astill of a daughter.

John

Astill

Wednesday 13/04/1881

Derby Mercury

Fatal Accident to a Cricketer Near Derby.

John

Astill

Wednesday 23/12/1885

Birmingham Daily Post

London Gazette - from last night's gazette: - Ajudications: - John Astill, Blackstone street, Nottingham, Joiner and Ellen Astill, Blackstone Street, Nottingham, wife of John Astill, trading as dressmakers and fancy milliners.

John

Astill

Tuesday 27/12/1887

Pall Mall Gazette (London)

Decapitated on the Railway: - Shortly after the arrival of a Midland train at Nottingham from St. Pancras at half past five last evening, the body of John Astill, of Nottingham, was discovered lying upon the rails, the head being severed from the trunk. As no railway ticket was discovered about the remains it is inferred that Astill committed suicide.

John Tindale

Astill

Friday 12/10/1855

Daily News (London)

The Police Courts - Guildhall.

Mary

Astill

Friday 10/03/1876

Liverpool Mercury

Deaths: - Astill - Feb. 25, at Dalton in Furness, aged 60, Mary Astill, relict of Paul Dutton formerly of Chester.

Philip Henry

Astill

Friday 04/07/1873

Birmingham Daily Post

Keeping Dogs Without Licenses: - Philip Henry Astill, Willis Street.

Thomas

Astill

Thursday 22/08/1811

Derby Mercury

London, Monday August 19.

Thomas

Astill

Wednesday 29/06/1831

Derby Mercury

Deaths: - On Saturday morning in St. Leonard Street, in this town, aged 71, Mrs. Astill, relict of the late Thomas Astill of Chellaston.

Thomas

Astill

Friday 06/05/1870

Birmingham Daily Post

Licensing Sessions: - At the Police Court yesterday, the following victualler's licenses were transferred: - White Hart, Paradise Street, from Sarah Spencer to Thomas Astill.

Thomas

Astill

Thursday 20/08/1885

Birmingham Daily Post

The Annual Licensing Meeting: - New Applications: - Music Licenses: - Thomas Astill, Colmore Arms, Grosvenor Street West.

Thomas

Astill

Friday 03/06/1887

Birmingham Daily Post

Transfer of Licenses: - Full-Licensed Houses, - Bull's Head, Moor Street to Thomas Astill.

W.

Astill

Tuesday 22/02/1831

Hull Packet & Humber Mercury

Marine Society London - On the 3rd. Ist., W. Astill Esq. M.P. was elected treasurer of this society.

William

Astill

Saturday 11/12/1847

Leeds Mercury

Leeds District Court of Bankruptcy. Business for the ensuing week. - Wm. Astill, of Lenton, Notts., ironmonger, &c., last exam and proof of debts.

William

Astill

Sunday 29/07/1866

Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper (London)

Charge of Stabbing a Police Constable.

William

Astill

Saturday 15/10/1870

Leicester Chronicle & Leicester Mercury

Attempted Wife Murder in Nottingham.

Ann and Henry Astill - Birmingham Police Court - Saturday - Threatening To Murder A Wife

Birmingham Daily Post, Monday 26 June 1865.

Henry Astill (49), barber, Hurst street, was charged with having threatened to stab his wife, Ann Astill. It was stated that on the previous evening the prisoner went to the house of his son, in the Bellbarn road, where his wife, who had left him in consequence of his threats, was staying. He appeared  to be in a very excited state, and said he would murder his wife, who, fortunately for herself, contrived to keep out of his sight. Police-sergeant Fletcher was ultimately sent for, and he found the prisoner in the street, with a carving knife concealed under his apron. The prisoner's wife stated that she had attended at the hospital in consequence of his brutality to her. He had frequently threatened her. The Magistrates ordered the prisoner to find two sureties of £10. each, and himself in £20., to keep the peace for six months, or in default of finding sureties to be imprisoned for one month.
Annie and William Astill - Attempted Wife Murder in Nottingham - Leicester Chronicle & Leicester Mercury,

Saturday 15 October 1870.

On Monday a shocking attempt was made to murder a woman in Nottingham, the circumstances of the outrage being of a particularly brutal character. The would-be murderer is a labourer named Wm. Astill, who has until recently been in the employ of Mr. Loverseed, contractor, and the unfortunate victim of his violence is his wife, Annie Astill, the daughter of respectable parents living in Shelton-street, Great Freeman-street.

Astill married his wife some years ago, and made her exceedingly miserable by the violence of his temper and by his habits. They had one child, and lived in Northumberland-street, where they had frequent quarrels, and where the poor woman was subjected to continual ill-treatment and brutality. After repeated warnings, she left her husband and went to reside with her father in Shelton-street. Thither her husband followed her and annoyed her by his importunities and threats. She resisted all his endeavours to compel her to return to his house, and he subsequently left Northumberland-street and went to reside in Wellington-street.

On Monday morning about eleven o'clock he called at the house in Shelton-street and asked to see his wife. She went to him and he demanded that she should immediately return home with him. On her refusal to do so he used threats and supplications, and in the end left the house saying that he would return in the evening when she would have doubtless changed her mind.

At four o'clock he again came to the house and went into one of the rooms where he was met by his wife. He asked her whether she had decided on returning home, and she replied in the negative. Immediately he pulled a pistol out of his pocket, and fired it at her. The ball grazed her temple, and ploughed a deep wound across her head, from which the blood flowed profusely. Her mother heard the shot and screamed for assistance. Astill, when he saw that his wife was not killed, rushed at her, seized a razor, and attempted to cut her throat. She struggled with him and a fearful scene occurred. He struck her about the head with his disengaged hand, and tried to knock her down; but she, despite the weakness resulting from loss of blood, fought against him, clasped the blade of the razor in her hands, and succeeded in breaking it. Her hands were cut in a frightful manner, and after desperate efforts on the part of his victim to effect her escape from the room, Astill overpowered her, and with the broken razor gashed her throat in a horrible way. he inflicted an open, oblong wound, extending almost from the ear to the chin, but happily the position of the body prevented him from cutting the windpipe, and before he could effect his purpose assistance arrived, and he rushed out of the house.

The confusion was so great that no one thought of following him, and he succeeded in making his escape, leaving behind him the pistol, the razor, and his hat. He was seen by a tradesman running hatless along Northumberland-street in the direction of Wellington-street, and the people with whom he lodged informed the police that he entered the house, took a hat, and went out again without giving a word of explanation.

The poor victim of his brutality was found lying on the floor of the house in Shelton-street in a state of unconsciousness, and messengers were at once despatched for medical assistance. Dr. Souter arrived, and dressed her wounds, which were of a fearful character. Since then she has been progressing favourably, and it is thought that she will recover. Both Astill and his wife are natives of Quorndon, near Loughborough, and they removed to Nottingham only about six months ago. Astill's parents still live at Quorndon, and he worked at Mountsorrel stone quarries until he came to Nottingham. He has not yet been captured.

The Attempted Wife Murder At Nottingham - Birmingham Daily Post, Wednesday 19 October 1870.

At the Borough Police Court, yesterday (Tuesday), a man named William Astill was brought up, charged with attempting to murder his wife. It appears that prisoner deliberately fired at his wife with a loaded pistol, which, fortunately, did not kill her. He then laid hold of her and tried to cut her throat, inflicting severe injuries in the chin, and nearly cutting two of her fingers off. A struggle ensued between the pair, but he did not succeed in accomplishing his object. He immediately made his escape, and nothing of his whereabouts was known until Monday last, when a telegram was received by the police authorities, stating that the prisoner had been captured at Wirksworth, in Derbyshire. He was brought to Nottingham the same night and lodged in gaol. Owing to the prisoner's wife being unable to attend the Court through the severe injuries she had sustained, the Magistrates remanded the prisoner.

Liverpool Mercury, Friday 10 March 1871.

At the Nottingham Assizes yesterday, William Astill, a labourer, was sentenced to penal servitude for life for attempting to murder his wife by shooting her.

Release of a Convict - Daily News (London), Thursday 6 August 1891.

Yesterday, William Astill, a native of Quorn, Leicestershire, was released from Portland. In 1871 he was sentenced to penal servitude for life on the charge of wounding with intent to murder his wife. He was known to be of good character, and his friends at Quorn have lately successfully petitioned the Home Secretary for his release. After visiting his old home, Astill goes to San Francisco.
Edward Astill - Serious Offence Against the Cattle Plague - Leeds Mercury, Tuesday 9 October 1866.

At the County Public-Office, at Leicester, on Saturday, before the Rev. H.J. Hoskyns and other magistrates, Edward Astill, farmer of Thorpe Satchville, was charged with directing Thomas Palmer, his cowman, to move twenty bullocks more than 500 yards along the highway at Syston, on the 26th ult., without a license. On the morning of the above day the defendant ordered his cowman ,palmer, to take the bullocks to Syston station, and about two o'clock in the afternoon defendant went to the station master and ordered three cattle trucks to be in readiness to take the beasts on to London. he told the station master, Mr. Bramley, that he had not a license, nor did he think one at all necessary. Mr. Bramley, who had sent a messenger for one, which was refused, at length went to Mr. Woodcock, of Rearsby, for a license, but he also was unsuccessful. At six o'clock the cattle arrived at the station but were refused, no license accompanying them; they were therefore turned into a field. A license was eventually obtained from Mr. E.A. Paget, a magistrate of Thorpe Satchville, and between nine and ten o'clock at night the bullocks were removed from the field to the station and transmitted to London, the defendant having preceded them by an afternoon train. The Bench considered this a bad case, as defendant had offended against the law in five or six points, and had rendered himself liable to a fine of £100. He was ordered to pay the costs of £1. 17s. and a fine of £8. 3s. (total £10) or suffer one months hard labour.
John Astill - Pickpockets at the Aulton Market - Aberdeen Journal, Wednesday 3 November 1875.

Three pickpockets, giving their names as John Wilson from Glasgow, Andrew Murphy from Belfast and John Ashgall or Astill from Nottingham, were apprehended in St Luke's Fair, Old Aberdeen, by the County Police. Several missing pocket books were found in their possession.

Aberdeen Journal, Wednesday 10 November 1875.

The Pickpocketing Cases at the Aulton Market: - At the Sheriff Criminal Court on Wednesday - before Sheriff Dove Wilson - Andrew Murphy and John Astill were charged with having on 27th October, on Aulton Market Stance, or at Kittybrewster Railway station, stolen a memorandum book from the person of a farmer. Murphy was also charged with having assaulted Sergeant Adams, of the county police, while in the execution of his duty, by kicking and biting him to the effusion of blood. Murphy pleaded guilty to the assault, but denied the theft. Astill at first said that he found the book, but then pleaded guilty. The Sheriff deferred delivering sentence till Saturday, and bail of £10 each was accepted. John Wilson, the other accomplice, after being examined, was liberated meantime. On Saturday the accused failed to appear, and their bail was declared forfeited.
John Astill - Fatal Accident to a Cricketer Near Derby - Derby Mercury, Wednesday 13 April 1881.

At the Arboretum Hotel, Osmaston-road, Mr. Coroner Close held an inquest on Monday evening, on the body of William Wagg, aged 22, labourer, of 71, Shaftesbury-crescent, Shaftesbury-street, who died in consequence of injuries he received whilst playing at cricket at Old Normanton, on Saturday last. John Astill, of 31, Shaftesbury-crescent, said that he was playing at cricket with deceased and others at a field at Old Normanton, on Saturday afternoon. A ball was struck in the air by one of the players, about in the middle of the wicket. Witness ran to catch the ball, and just as he get itin his hand, deceased, who was also trying to catch it, but whom witness did not see, ran up against him and their heads bumped together very hard. Both were knocked down and witness was senseless for two or three seconds. They both got up and complained of being hurt. Deceased remained on the field until the finish of the game, about five minutes afterwards, but witness was not sure if he played any more. the Jury found that death was accidental.
John Astill - Decapitated on the Railway - Pall Mall Gazette (London), Tuesday 27 December 1887.

Shortly after the arrival of a Midland train at Nottingham from St. Pancras at half past five last evening, the body of John Astill, of Nottingham, was discovered lying upon the rails, the head being severed from the trunk. As no railway ticket was discovered about the remains it is inferred that Astill committed suicide.

Aberdeen Journal, Thursday 29 December 1887.

Determined Suicide: - A determined case of suicide was investigated by the Nottingham borough coroner yesterday. Ten days ago an iron merchant's traveller, John Astill, aged 66, attempted suicide by throwing himself from a wall 30 feet high. He was discharged from custody last Saturday promising not to repeat the attempt. His whereabouts on Sunday were unknown, but on Monday night he got on the rails at the Midland Station unperceived, his head being severed from his body by a passing train. Verdict - Suicide during temporary insanity.
John Tindale Astill - The Police Courts - Guildhall - Daily News (London), Friday 12 October 1855.

John Tindale Astill was brought up for further examination before Alderman Hunter, relative to the charge of embezzling 50l. Belonging to Mr. ex-Sheriff Croll, his master. The evidence on the former occasion was to the effect that the prisoner was occasionally employed as a messenger and copying clerk in Mr. Croll's office in Coleman-street, and on Saturday week last he was sent in the direction of Tottenham to deliver ten shares in the Winchester Waterworks to Miss Harris and Miss Strombone, and to receive from them 5l. per share, with which he decamped. His receipt was put in evidence to show that the money had been paid to him; but as he was not, strictly speaking, a servant, being engaged for that occasion only, a question arose as to whether the charge was one of embezzlement or only a breach of trust. Edward Funnell, a detective officer, said - on Wednesday, the 3rd inst., I took the prisoner into custody in Coleman-street. I told him he was charged with absconding with 50l. I asked him what he had done with the money, and he then gave up 27l. 16s. 1d. I afterwards searched his lodgings, at 140, princes-road, Kennington, and there found a new dressing case, and a new pair of patent leather boots. From inquiries I have since made, I have ascertained that he has squandered the rest of the money away. Alderman Hunter said the prisoner appeared to have been employed in the capacity of clerk to Mr. Croll, and he therefore commit him to trial on the charge of embezzlement.
Thomas Astill - London, Monday August 19.  - Derby Mercury, Thursday 22 August 1811.

Thomas Astill, head game-keeper to Earl Spencer, at Wimbledon Park, arrived on Saturday morning at his own house speechless, and having his skull dreadfully fractured, apparently by a bullet from a horse-pistol which had perforated his hat in two places; he was also much struck about the thighs by the hilt of a sword or cutlass. He is supposed to have received these dangerous hurts from a poacher whom he was seen in company with the same morning.    The Leeds Mercury: Saturday 11, April 1812, Surrey Assizes: - At Kingston, on Friday, William Holt was indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Astill on the 17th day of August last, at Wimbledon. This was the case of the game-keeper killed by a poacher in Lord Spencer's Park. It appeared that the prisoner who was a poacher, on being apprehended by Astill, had struck him in a contest for arms with the handle of a cutlass, which forced the skull of the deceased into the brain and produced his death. - the learned judge said, it was clear the case only amounted to manslaughter, as it was in the heat of blood, and not by malise propense, which the law required to constitute murder. - the Jury found him guilty of manslaughter, and the learned Judge immediately sentenced him to twelve months imprisonment, and a fine of 1s.

In The News

The following articles are taken from the British Library collection of 19th century newspapers which have been digitised and made available on the British Newspapers 1800-1900 website.

In The News

The following articles are taken from the British Library collection of 19th century newspapers which have been digitised and made available on the British Newspapers 1800-1900 website.