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Astle One-Name Study
with Astles, Astell & Astill

Name


Date

Newspaper

Article

Ann

Astles

Friday 27/10/1899

Bristol Mercury

Charge of Bigamy: - At Northwich, yesterday, John Hickson, aged 63, of Scotland road Liverpool, and captain of the Manchester Ship Canal Company's vessel Piggott, was committed for trial at Chester Assize for feloniously marrying Catherine Burton Eckersley, Liverpool, his former wife being then alive. The evidence showed that prisoner first married Ann Astles at Great Budworth in 1861, and married again at St. Andrew's, Birkenhead, last year. Bail was allowed.

Frederick William

Astles

Saturday 23/09/1854

The Leicester Chronicle: or, Commercial and Agricultural Advertiser

Marriages - On the 19th inst., at Shearsby, by the Rev. P. Willson, rector of Knaptoft, Mr. F.W. Astles, of Smethwick, Staffordshire, to Cornelia, youngest daughter of the late Andrew Wilson Esq of Knaptoft Hall, in this county.to Mrs. Alice Batty, both of Chorlton-upon-Medlock.

Frederick William

Astles

Tuesday 20/12/1859

Birmingham Daily Post

Smethwick - At a meeting recently of the Council of the Royal College of Preceptors, Mr Frederick Astles, of Bearwood School, Smethwick, was unanimously elected a member, and his school placed in union with the college.

Frederick William

Astles

Thursday 15/08/1861

Birmingham Daily Post

Bristol Assizes - Monday- Hicks v Astles.

Frederick

Astles

Wednesday 24/10/1883

Liverpool Mercury

Threatening to Murder.

Frederick William

Astles

Saturday 26/10/1861

Bristol Mercury

From the London Gazettes - Bankrupts - Friday October 18: - Frederick William Astles, Smethwick, Staffordshire, Schoolmaster, Oct 28, at the same place. Solicitors, James & Knight, Birmingham.

Frederick William

Astles

Monday 20/01/1862

Birmingham Daily Post

Bankruptcy Appointments, Monday January 20 - F.W. Astles, Smethwick, Schoolmaster, adjd. Dis.

Frederick William

Astles

Monday 21/01/1862

Birmingham Daily Post

Birmingham Bankruptcy Court.

George

Astles

Saturday 15/08/1874

Manchester Times

Extraordinary Fraud on a Banking Company.

Harvey Eustace

Astles

Wednesday 30/04/1862

Aberdeen Journal

University of Aberdeen - Graduates in Medicine - April 1862 - At the same time the following candidates were considered to have passed part of their Medical Graduation examinations:- Harvey Eustace Astles

Harvey Eustace

Astles

Wednesday 19/02/1873

Daily News - London

From last Night's gazette - Partnerships dissolved - H.E. Astles and J. Jessop. Halstead and Earl's Colne Essex, surgeons.

J.

Astles

Wednesday 4/08/1852

Derby Mercury

Staffordshire - Leek Police Court Friday July 30th.

John

Astles

Friday 23/02/1877

Birmingham Daily Post

Gleanings - John Astle who was put into a house as bailiff under a distress warrant, was convicted, at Knutsford Cheshire on Wednesday, of stealing goods from the premises, and sentenced to two months hard labour.

John W.

Astles

Monday 14/08/1865

Birmingham Daily Post

Oxford Local Examinations: The lists of the successful candidates of the Oxford local Examinations, which commenced on the 6th June, were issued by the Oxford Delegacy on Saturday. The total number of candidates who sent in their names for examination was 1.246 - 940 juniors, and 301 seniors. Of this number 560 junior and 209 senior candidates have passed.  Of the 560 junior candidates who obtained certificates, 52 are placed in the first division, 153 in the second and 355 in the third. The following is a list of the successful candidates connected with this district. An asterisk is prefixed to the names of those candidates who have satisfied the examiners in the rudiments of faith and religion.  - Third Division - * J. W. Astles, Worcester, Cathedral School, Worcester.

Joseph

Astles

Monday 24/08/1840

Morning Chronicle - London

Assize Intelligence - Northern Circuit - Liverpool, August 21 - Civil Side. DOE DEM Grice and Another v. Astles.

Joseph

Astles

Sunday 6/6/1841

Era - London

London Gazettes - Insolvent Debtors' Petitions Saturday, May 29. Orders have been made, vesting in the Provisional Assignee the Estate and Effects of the following Persons: - Joseph Astles, Warrington, Lancashire, victualler.

Mary

Astles

Wednesday 19/08/1857

Derby Mercury

Marriages: - On the 6th inst., at the Catholic Chapel, Leek, by the Rev. M. Power, Henry G. Bermingham Esq, of the firm J. and H. Bermingham, silk manufacturers, to Mary, second daughter of Mr. Astles, all of that place.

Mary

Astles

Saturday 01/11/1890

Birmingham Daily Post

Married: - Luke - Astles. - On the 25th ult., George Luke, son of Thomas Luke, to Laura Mary Astles, daughter of the late Robert Wynn Astles

Mary Ann

Astles

Saturday 1/07/1837

Manchester Times & Gazette

Congleton - Died: - On the 27th ultimo, aged 22 years, Mary Ann daughter of Mr Joseph Astles of the Royal Oak, Astbury; much respected.

Mary Ann

Astles

Saturday 6/10/1838

Manchester Times & Gazette

Congleton - Married: - On the 1st inst. Mr George Harvey to Miss Mary Ann Astles, both of Congleton.

Matilda

Astles

Saturday 21/11/1874

Liverpool Mercury

Charge of Criminal Assault against a schoolmaster. - At the Nantwich police court, on Thursday, before the Rev. J. Folliott, Daniel Harker, a one-armed schoolmaster at the Nantwich workhouse, was charged with aggravated assaults upon Rebecca Arthern and Matilda Astles, children inmates of the workhouse. Details of a most disgusting nature were given by both girls. The prisoner was sentenced to four months imprisonment with hard labour for each offence.

Mrs. Astles & John Astles

Astles

Friday 28/01/1820

Liverpool Mercury

Deaths - On Saturday the 11th of December last, at Nantwich, Mrs Astles the wife of Mr. John Astles, tailor aged 87; and on Thursday, the 6th inst. Her husband aged 97.

Richard

Astles Brown

Monday 24/08/1840

Morning Chronicle - London

Assize Intelligence - Northern Circuit - Liverpool, August 21 - Civil Side. DOE DEM Grice and Another v. Astles.

Richard

Astles Brown

Sunday 7/1/1855

Era - London

Transfer of Public House Licenses at Manchester - A special session was held at the City Police Court on Tuesday last when the magistrates granted the following transfers: Sir Ralph Abercrombie, Bootle Street, from Richard Astles Brown to Austen Anderton.

Samuel

Astles

Saturday 22/12/1838

Manchester Times & Gazette

Deaths - On the 17th inst. Aged 48 years, Mr. Samuel Astles, liquor merchant, of Warrington.

Samuel

Astles

Monday 24/08/1840

Morning Chronicle - London

Assize Intelligence - Northern Circuit - Liverpool, August 21 - Civil Side. DOE DEM Grice and Another v. Astles.

Sarah

Astles

Friday 30/06/1837

Liverpool Mercury

Deaths - On Friday last, aged 78, Sarah relict of the late Richard Astles of Frodsham, - deeply regretted.

William

Astles

Saturday 5/6/1841

Manchester Times & Gazette

Marriages - On the 29th ult., at St. Saviour's Church, by the Rev. E. Birch, Mr. William Astles, to Mrs. Alice Batty, both of Chorlton-upon-Medlock.

William

Astles

Saturday 7/6/1845

Manchester Times & Gazette

Died: - On the 31st ult. of apoplexy, aged 45 years, Mr. William Astles, coach proprietor, Chorlton-upon-Medlock.

William

Astles

Wednesday 4/08/1852

Derby Mercury

Staffordshire - Leek Police Court Friday July 30th.

William

Astles

Friday 3/7/1863

Birmingham Daily Post

Staffordshire Midsummer Sessions.

William Henry

Astles

Tuesday 29/06/1897

Liverpool Mercury

Cheshire Quarter Sessions - Other Sentences: -James Bayley, 19 labourer, was sentenced to six months imprisonment for stealing a horse's brass face-piece, the goods of William Henry Astles, at Darnhall, on June 10.

Frederick William Astles - Bristol Assizes - Monday- Hicks v Astles. Birmingham Post, Thursday 15 August 1861.

The plaintiff was Mr. Charles Hicks, a surgeon of Smethwick, Staffordshire, and the defendant was a schoolmaster of the same place. This was action to recover £20. For many years the parties were intimate friends but recently a little misunderstanding had taken place between them which had given rise to this action. In 1860 defendant owed plaintiff a balance of £12. 7s. for medical attendance. A brother of the defendant had acted as assistant to plaintiff, and defendant wishing to get him into the Birmingham School of Medicine, plaintiff advanced defendant £20., taking his IOU for the amount. In April 1861, defendant called in another medical man, and plaintiff asked him to square accounts. Afterwards defendant's brother called upon him and asked that his security might be taken instead of that of his brother for the £20., and plaintiff consented to exchange the IOU for the young man's note of hand upon condition that the medical bill was immediately paid. He then gave up the IOU and took the note. The medical bill was not then paid. It had been paid into court since the commencement of the action. Harvey Astles, defendant's brother denied that he promised, as a condition for the plaintiff giving up the IOU, that his account for medical attendance should be forthwith paid by defendant, and said the IOU was exchanged unconditionally for his own promissory note. His lordship summed up in favour of plaintiff. Verdict for plaintiff for £20.
Frederick Astles - Threatening to Murder. - Liverpool Mercury, Wednesday 24 October 1883.

An extraordinary charge of assault was preferred on Monday Evening, before the Nantwich magistrates, against William Beard, greengrocer, Tunstall, and Frederick Astles, greengrocer, Nantwich. The complainant was Mr. Bateman, the well known agriculturist and valuer, of Chorley, near nantwich, deputy vice-chairman of the Nantwich Board of Guardians, and twice president of the Primitive Methodist Conference. The defendants pleaded guilty. The assault was of a very remarkable charachter. Mr Bateman who is now 84 years of age, said that he called at the Wilbraham Arms Hotel, Nantwich, for his letters. While there Astles called him a hypocrite, said he abused and crushed the poor, and then growing excited, called him a "scoundrel", and putting his hand into his breast coat-pocket, said, "I have a revolver, and I will blow your - brains out." Beard thereupon jumped up, and in the most excited manner exclaimed to Astles, "If you can't do it, I can and I'll blow his - brains out." Mr. Bateman then looked up and discovered Bateman was pointing a double-barrelled gun at his breast, and crying out "If you are not ready to die, prepare, for you have not long to live!" Mr. Bateman, who despite his great age, is wonderfully vigorous, leaped up, and, knocking the barrel of the gun to one side, left the house to secure a police constable, and the defendants then disappeared. The men subsequently apologised for the threats, and Mr. Bateman now interceded on their behalf. Under these circumstances the chairman (Captain Massey) said the magistrates would let them off simply with a fine of £1 and costs, or a months imprisonment with hard labour.
Frederick William Astles - Birmingham Bankruptcy Court - Birmingham Post, Monday 21/01/1862

Yesterday Before Mr. Commissioner Sanders. - In re F.W. Astles, Smethwick, schoolmaster. - Adjourned last examination and discharge.Mr. Knight appeared for the bankrupt, and Mr. John Smith appeared on behalf of Mr. Hick a creditor to oppose. Mr. Smith said that it appeared that for some years bankrupt had carried on a school at Smethwick, but that he was induced to become a surety for his wife's brother, and that a verdict was obtained against him by Mr. Hick, the holder of the surety, at the last Bristol assizes. Immediately after this verdict, his brother-in-law, for whom he had become security, took out a writ against him: in nine days the brother -in-law took possession and thus prevented Mr. Hick from taking possession. The consequence was, that while the bankrupt owed £387. 5s. 8d., there was not one shilling for the creditors: and that another brother-in-law was now carrying on the school, which was as successful as ever. The bankrupt not being in trade, and the offence having been committed before the New Bankruptcy Act was passed, there might be a difficulty in bringing to bear the punishment given to those who, under the 256th section of the old Act, had made a frivolous and vexatious defence; still he might be reached for having given fraudulent preferences. - The learned Commissioner said he should probably, had bankrupt been a trader, have severely censured him; but as he was not a trader, he did not think the Court had power to do so. Mr. Knight for bankrupt, said that there had been no frivolous and vexatious defence, as it had been conducted under the advice of his partner, Mr. James, seconded by Mr. Karslake and Mr. Coleridge. As to the fraudulent preference, the brother-in-law only got £2., the rest being seized for rent. bankrupt was discharged.
George Astles - Extraordinary Fraud against a Banking Company. - Manchester Times, Saturday 15/08/1874.

The hearing of the charge of conspiracy to defraud against Thos. Fowles, 47, auctioneer, Nantwich, Thos. Littler, gentleman, 65, Christleton and George Astles, 67, labourer, Nantwich, which was commenced on Wednesday night, was resumed on Thursday morning at the Chester Assizes, before Mr. Justice Quain. The prisoners were indicted for conspiring to defraud the Manchester and Liverpool District banking Company by "unlawfully and maliciously committing damage, injury, and spoil to and upon certain real property there, of a private nature, called or known by the name of Copthorne Bone Works, the said damage being an amount exceeding £5, at Audlem between 15th and 19th May. in the evidence for the prosecution it appeared that the bone works were held by the Banking Company as security for advances made, and it was for the destruction of the works that proceedings were taken against the prisoners. On the night of the 14th May a number of men went from Nantwich to Audlem, and having received instructions to do so from Mr. Fowles and Mr. Littler proceeded to pull down the buildings. The work went on during the next day, and ceased suddenly. On the 18th a further lot of men went to the works, and pulled out the boiler and destroyed the whole of the buildings, including an immense chimney which having been undermined fell to the ground bodily. The prisoner Astles was there instructing the men, and when someone interfered with him he said "I am master here, and shall do what I like." The materials were sold - some of them on the spot, for which Astles received the money; and others at Crewe by an auctioneer. The property was deteriorated to the extent of £1,000 by these proceedings. His Lordship in summing up, said that if the prisoners believed honestly that this was their property, then however wrongly they had acted, they would not be amenable to the criminal law. But the jury must consider whether they would have acted as they did with what they believed to be their own property. The security of the bank was reduced from £1,250 to about £100. The jury must consider whether the prisoners believed that the property destroyed was the property of Littler, or whether they knew that it was not his, and destroyed it in order to spite and defraud the bank. His Lordship added that the act of Astles was not within the section, and he must therefore, be acquitted. The jury found Littler and Fowles guilty, but recommended the former to mercy, and Astles not guilty. Fowles was sentenced to twelve months imprisonment with hard labour, and Littler, who his Lordship believed to have been a mere tool in the hands of Fowles, to one month's imprisonment with hard labour.
J & William Astles - Staffordshire - Leek Police Court Friday July 30th: - Derby Mercury, Wednesday 4/08/1852.

William Astles and J. Astles of Leek, silk twisters, were charged with having caused a great uproar and disturbance, on Thursday evening. From the evidence, it appeared that their conduct had been very bad, and their offence was very greatly aggravated by their violence to the police constables who endeavoured to persuade them to desist, and were obliged to make prisoners of both of them. They were each fined for the disturbances and were given to understand that, probably severe proceedings would be taken against them for their uncalled for and ill usage of the constables.
Samuel Astles - Assize Intelligence Northern Circuit - Liverpool, August 21
Civil Side. DOE DEM Grice and Another v. Astles. - Morning Chronicle (London), Monday 24/08/1840.

This was an action to recover possession of some messuages and lands in the parish of Warrington. This was an action of ejectment by the devisees in trust under the will of Samuel Astles, of Warrington to recover certain property claimed and held by the defendant as heir at law to the deceased. The question for the jury would be whether Samuel Astles had left a valid will. He had for many years carried on business as an innkeeper at Warrington. He was a bachelor, and being a man of some property, several individuals had recommended their children to his notice by choosing him as their godfather. To each of these he had by his will left a legacy. At the time of his death he was also the reputed father of a son of one Catherine Brown, whose sister was married to John Grice, one of the devisees. There was a considerable intimacy between Grice and the testator. Grice had formerly kept his books until he began to employ a barmaid, and they were also joint trustees of some property at Warrington. This son of Catherine Brown the testator had always brought up as his own, and he, as well as a son of John Grice, lived in a house with him till his death. He had left a legacy to each, and desired they might be brought up together under the care of Catherine Brown. Samuel Astles had also a brother, the present defendant, who at his death owed him a considerable sum of money. To him he also he had left a legacy of £200, over and above the amount of his debt. During the testator's life there had been no doubt of his competency to conduct and manage his own affairs. Mr. John Ashton, attorney to the testator, stated that the deceased had given him instructions for the will. He gave several legacies of 19 guineas each. He stated he wished the boy Brown to take the name of Astles [Richard Astles Brown]. He seemed in full possession of his faculties. Mr. Steel, surgeon of Warrington was called and stated his belief that at the time the deceased signed the will he was not in a competent state to comprehend the purport of the instrument, labouring as he then was under delirium tremens. Anne Cash said she was barmaid to the late Mr. Astles to the time of his death. She described his illness and said that on the Saturday night, when Mr. Ashton was reading the will, she took off her shoes, crept up the stairs, and listened at the door to what was going on. Mr. Ashton read very quick, and she heard him say Richard Astles Brown. John Grice said that had better be altered, and she saw Mr. Ashton go to the table, and he appeared to alter it. She heard Mr. Astles mutter something to himself, and he called out louder "Hey Hey." When Mr. Steel came she went in to tell them the doctor was come, and they asked her to tell him to wait. When she was in the room Mr. Astles eyes were directed to the top of the room, and he was hiccuping and muttering. When Mr. Steel had left she went and listened again; and when Mr. Ashton had finished reading she heard John Grice say that would do - it could not be better. She did not hear Mr. Astles make any answer to the remark. Mr. Astles was then raving, and talking to himself. Witness is now in the service of Joseph Astles, the brother of the deceased, at the same house, and in September will have been there two years. His Lordship having gone minutely through the evidence the jury consulted together and returned a verdict for the plaintiffs.

Chester Consistory Court - Thursday December 3rd. - Liverpool Mercury, Friday 11/12/1840.

Before the Rev. H. Raikes M.A., Chancellor of the Diocese. - Joseph Astles, Promonant, v. The Executrix of the last will of Samuel Astles. - This case, which has excited considerable interest in the vicinity of Warrington, where the deceased Samuel Astles was a publican and spirit dealer, came on for judgement today. The validity of the will had previously been established by the verdict of a jury at the Liverpool assizes. The Chancellor delivered a very elaborate judgement. He stated that the will was executed in the prescence of Mr. Ashton, solicitor and his clerk, on the 15th December 1838. It appears from the evidence that Samuel Astles, the testator, was a man generally respected, and of habits more guarded from liquors than persons in his line of life were. It appeared that by the will, he left a legacy to his brother Joseph Astles, the promovant, of £120, and to his godson William Grice, £200; and after some other small legacies he directed the residue should go to Elizabeth Brown, until her son Richard Brown, whom he designated as his natural son, should be of age. The will was not deficient in any respect. The Chancellor then went over the evidence adduced at the trial, and concluded by saying, that after having given the fullest consideration to that evidence, he felt satisfied that at the time of making the will in question, Samuel Astles was of sound mind, and not incapacitated from executing such an instrument. With respect to costs, he said that the promovant had gone into the suit with all its risks, and there was nothing in it to show that it was a justifiable inquiry, therefore he must be condemned in the taxed cost of the suit. Mr. Pate, for the promovant, gave notice of appeal.
William Astles -Staffordshire Midsummer Sessions - Birmingham Daily Post, Friday 3/7/1863.

Yesterday before the Earl of Lichfield - Extensive Robbery of Silk at Leek. - John Peacock and William Mellor were indicted for breaking into the warehouse of George Mellor and James Augustus Deane, at Leek, and stealing 150lbs. weight of silk, their property. George Austin, William Joseph Austin, William Lowe, and William Astles were charged with receiving the same knowing it to have been stolen. Soon after the robbery the police took the prisoners Mellor and Peacock into custody on suspicion of being connected with robbery. When before the Magistrates, Mellor acknowledged his guilt and gave evidence which led to the apprehension of the other prisoners. Mellor who pleaded guilty and gave evidence against the other prisoners, was sentenced to three months imprisonment. The Jury convicted the other prisoners, who were sentenced as follows: - Peacock to seven years penal servitude; Lowe to six years penal servitude; George Austin, Joseph Austin and William Astles, to five years penal servitude each.

In The News

The following articles are taken from the British Library collection of 19th century newspapers which have been digitised and made available on the British Newspapers 1800-1900 website.

In The News

The following articles are taken from the British Library collection of 19th century newspapers which have been digitised and made available on the British Newspapers 1800-1900 website.